Sam Bush

  • Imperial Theatre
  • 749 Broad Street
  • PO Box 31126, Augusta, GA 30903
  • Augusta, GA 30901
  • Dates vary
  • Time: 7:30 PM

   
   

Presented by Morris Museum of Art Budweiser True Music's Southern Soul and Song

If joy were a person, he’d bring both peace and frenzy. He’d be full of music, light, and energy that soothes even as it stirs us up. Eyes closed, wire-rim glasses in place, mandolin pressed against his ribs, joy would be Sam Bush on a stage.

“I feel fortunate that when it’s time to play, no matter how I feel physically or mentally, once the downbeat starts, my mind goes to a place that’s all music,” says Bush. “The joy of the music comes to me and overtakes me sometimes––I just become part of the music.”

That rapt merging of life and art fills Bush’s new album Storyman, a freewheeling collection that gleefully picks and chooses from jazz, folk, blues, reggae, country swing, and bluegrass to create a jubilant noise only classifiable as the Sam Bush sound. Many of the songs are stories––several of them true––and the legendary mandolin player co-wrote every one of them with friends including Guy Clark, Emmylou Harris, Jon Randall Stewart, Jeff Black, and others.

“I’m hoping it just kind of flows for people and makes them go, ‘Hey! It’s a Sam record. It sounds like Sam and the band,’” Bush says. “But for the first time ever, I also find myself thinking, ‘I hope you enjoy the stories.’ It’s my singer-songwriter record.”

The Father of Newgrass and King of Telluride has long since established himself as roots royalty, revered for both his solo and sideman work, which includes time with Harris, Lyle Lovett, and Béla Fleck. But instead of kicking back and soaking up honors such as an Americana Music Association Lifetime Achievement Award and suite of Grammys and International Bluegrass Music Association trophies, Bush still strives relentlessly to create something new.

 

 

 

The Wells, Augusta's Theatre Beautiful was built for the presenting of vaudeville and photoplays to the community by Mr. Jake Wells. The Theatre opened on Monday, February 18, 1918. After the acquisition of several other local theatres by Lynch Enterprises, The Wells Theatre's was changed to The Imperial Theatre. Throughout the early 1900's the theatre continued to provide the city of Augusta and the surrounding area with great entertainment. Included in this bill of fare was Leo Carrillo who later became the Cisco Kid's partner, Poncho; and the famous ballet dancer Anna Povlova. It is in the Broad Street Historical District and is listed on the National Register as important to the character of the entire district. Although it is a certainty that a large number of celebrities of the day must have graced the stage of the theatre only a few are documented in the Imperial Theatre's archives. Among the earliest recorded appearances was the visit of Charlie Chaplin, who appeared at the theatre on April 18, 1918 selling Liberty war bonds. Today, the historic Imperial Theatre serves as downtown Augusta's home for the performing arts. Audiences can see Ballet, Broadway Plays and Musicals, Concerts from both local and international artists and more on the Imperial stage.